Port St. Joe Lighthouse (Cape San Blas)

This beautiful Lighthouse is located in a park at Port. St. Joe, FL. It is one of four lighthouses on Florida’s Forgotten Coast Lighthouse Tour. This lighthouse has a very long history of damage and replacement by many storms. Now, surrounded by trees it is just a short distance away from the city’s waterfront.

The first lighthouse was built in 1847 on a site, “deemed to be entirely secure from overflow or inundation.” But in during a strong gale in 1851, it collapsed. A year later, a new lighthouse was constructed but the light was not installed until 1855. Ten months later a hurricane ruined it. A third lighthouse was built in 1859. During the Civil War, the light was removed from the lighthouse, but the keepers dwelling and the wooden portions of the tower were burned.

Life was not easy for the lighthouse keepers as well. One drowned, one was murdered and I could go on and on, but here is the link to its history which I think you will find very interesting. Also, the locations have been changed many times. At one period, the Air Forced owned the lighthouse. This lighthouse is now 12 miles away from its original location.

Here is the link: http://lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=591.





Winter Tree

It takes a wet snowfall in winter to have the snow stick to the trees.  If the weather changes and the sun comes out, or if it gets windy, the snow quickly falls off or melts off  the tree. So the trick is to be ready right after the snowfall if you want to capture a good scene.

The photos shown in these scenes, one in color and one in black & white provides two different prospectives. The one in color captures the blue of the sky which then shows up on the snow. In my opinion, while the scene is colorful, you lose some the detail from the old oak trees in the forest.

The black & white view is more dramatic and shows more detail of the tree and more separation in the background. in my opinion. This photograph was captured in 2002 and has not been photoshopped. As in most photographs, the larger you go with the print, the more detail appears. Click on the photos to enlarge them.

 

Winter tree color web

 

 

 

winter tree b&w web

 

 

 

 

 









 

Chicago Back Alley 1965

Back Alley Scene wm webThis Featured Photo  was captured in 1965 while doing a self-assignment on a day in Chicago.  I left  Minnesota on a midnight train to Chicago and arrived with the morning commuters. I took photographs for 10 hours and then caught the 5 p.m. train back to Minnesota. This is one of the 100 scenes  I  captured that day.

There are two things going on here. One individual is picking scrap boxes on an ironed wheel cart while the man in  the white shirt, briefcase in hand, is heading towards work. I wonder how that same alley would look  today.

 

 

 

Overcast Days

Overcast days are great days for taking photographs. There are no harsh shadows and the sky will take on a gray or sometimes almost a white appearance whether you are taking color black and white photographs.

It is still best to have the sun, which you cannot see, at your back.  But even shooting into the sun will not give you any problems.  If you are using a camera which automatically sets your exposure, you will want to aim it at the subject and not up into the sky. Otherwise, the sky, which is still bright, will tend to give you an under exposed photograph.

The two scenes with this blog, one in color and the other in black and white, were taken on the same morning. probably within an hour of each other and about 15 miles apart. in Nova Scotia.

The color Pastel Boat Harbor scene provides a soft rendition with the water reflections of both the boat and the building in the background. This was the second photograph taken that morning and you can see just a bit of blue sky breaking through in the upper left hand corner.

The black and white “Barrel Factory” was taken earlier and the sky here is void of any contrast or clouds.

The old wood in the building, wood shingles, and certainly all the birds on the roof, make this a very interesting scene.

Shooting Into The Sun

Taking a photo into the sun may not be the easiest thing in the world to do, but the results you get will be more than satisfying…most of the time.

First, it is a great way to get silhouettes. But secondly, it will give a dramatic contrast to your photos.  If you have a camera with an automatic exposure, it may over expose your photos. A way to help compensate for that is to have the sun directly out of the scene. Or hide the sun behind something, like a tree or a cloud.

In The Sunlight on Leaves,  the sun is just up to the left of the photo and there was just a bit of glare. But the whiteness of the leaves against the dark background of the trees provides a 3-D  feel to the leaves. You can almost reach out and touch them.

The Escambia Bay Sunset you may have seen before. Here the sun was hidden behind the clouds and you can see some sun rays penetrating the cloud cover.

In the Cypress Sentinel scene the sun was hidden behind the tree   while the camera was pointed directly at the sun. By the way, that tree was only a a hundred yards away from the bay sunset scene. That was a “two-for one” afternoon.

While the Boat at Dusk photo captured just a bit of the sun, the sun was low enough in the sky as to not provide too much of a glare. The sun’s reflection on the water provides feeling of depth. The scene appears just a bit darker than it actually was.

The Sunrise on The Florida Keys shows a dramatic way to hid the sun. The camera was aimed directly at the sun, but the trees covered the sun from the lens and did now show any glare.

There are many other ways of shooting into the sun, but these are just a few.

Sunlight on Leaves wm

escambia bay 72 dpi wm copy

Cypress Sentinel water

Boat at dusk wm

Sunrise on the Florida Keys wm

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