Shooting Into The Sun

Taking a photo into the sun may not be the easiest thing in the world to do, but the results you get will be more than satisfying…most of the time.

First, it is a great way to get silhouettes. But secondly, it will give a dramatic contrast to your photos.  If you have a camera with an automatic exposure, it may over expose your photos. A way to help compensate for that is to have the sun directly out of the scene. Or hide the sun behind something, like a tree or a cloud.

In The Sunlight on Leaves,  the sun is just up to the left of the photo and there was just a bit of glare. But the whiteness of the leaves against the dark background of the trees provides a 3-D  feel to the leaves. You can almost reach out and touch them.

The Escambia Bay Sunset you may have seen before. Here the sun was hidden behind the clouds and you can see some sun rays penetrating the cloud cover.

In the Cypress Sentinel scene the sun was hidden behind the tree   while the camera was pointed directly at the sun. By the way, that tree was only a a hundred yards away from the bay sunset scene. That was a “two-for one” afternoon.

While the Boat at Dusk photo captured just a bit of the sun, the sun was low enough in the sky as to not provide too much of a glare. The sun’s reflection on the water provides feeling of depth. The scene appears just a bit darker than it actually was.

The Sunrise on The Florida Keys shows a dramatic way to hid the sun. The camera was aimed directly at the sun, but the trees covered the sun from the lens and did now show any glare.

There are many other ways of shooting into the sun, but these are just a few.

Sunlight on Leaves wm

escambia bay 72 dpi wm copy

Cypress Sentinel water

Boat at dusk wm

Sunrise on the Florida Keys wm

Florida Keys Sunrise

The Photo of the Week is another view of a sunrise on the Florida Keys. The rising sun coming through a broken layer of clouds gives a dramatic view of the two palm trees whose trunks have by curved the winds. It started to rain about 20 minutes after this scene was captured near Marathon, FL. Photo taken 2010.

Florida Keys Sunrise copy

Keep it Steady and Crisp

I always look for photographs that are crisp and in focus. Auto focusing lens help a lot, but how you take the photo also helps too. “Shoot Steady,” someone once told me. Don’t “snap” the shutter, just squeeze it gently and take a deep breath at the same time.. Even with an automatic focusing lens, if you jerk the camera when you snap the shutter your photo will come up blurred to a degree and not be as crisp as it should be. In other words, don’t move the camera when you snap the photograph.

Don’t hold the camera out in front of you, keep it as close to your eye as possible. With many cameras that you use on “auto” mode which means the shutter spend and the lens opening will be determined by the amount of light you have available, the darker the scene the slower the shutter speed and more of a chance for a blurred photo.

The photo with this blog has nothing to do with this subject, but is a nice sunrise scene. It was taken on the Florida keys. It was a very dark morning because of an approaching thunderstorm. Suddenly the sun burst through an opening in the clouds. I had my cameras nearby and took both black & white and colored photos.

The color photograph of the sunrise can be found in the “Other” gallery as well as a pastel sunset scene taken the same day at the end of the storm.

Sunrise Before The Storm

End of The Road

End of The RoadThe end of the road  (US Highway 1) is at Key West, FL., is about as far south as you can go in the states, I think. I do not know if this old pickup truck was driven there at one time or was hauled there, but now it sits on a dock at Key West as a tourist attraction. This photograph was taken on a cloudy rainy day which made the detail of the old truck stand out even more. Photo taken 2010.

A Spot of Light

Finding spots of lights in what might be a dark photograph helps to highlight the scene. You might find a spot of light coming through a shade tree…..or around the corner of a building which is mostly shaded.  I have found spots of light more by accident that planning them out. But it takes time to walk around the area to find that special beam of light coming through.

In this street scene in Key West, FL., the artist was busy trying to sell his paintings to some potential customers. They are highlighted by a spot of sunlight coming through a couple of trees. The dark brick of the wall and the art on the street  lead your eyes to the artist and his customers.They are almost incidental in the overall scene but the sun outlining the figures adds emphasis. Just beyond the people, you can see the darkness of the shade on the sidewalk again which also puts emphasis on the people. Photo taken 2010.

Art Customers

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